What is Technology Enhanced Learning?

The video below is a good starting point to help answer a common question.

 

What do we mean by ‘enhanced’?

Another good question and there are, of course, many answers to this. The response from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is as follows:

Efficiency – existing processes carried out in a more cost-effective, time-
effective, sustainable or scalable manner.
Enhancement – improving existing processes and the outcomes.
Transformation – radical, positive change in existing processes or introducing new processes.

HEFCE 2009, 2

To find out more about the meaning of TEL this article (Technology-Enhanced Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: What Is “Enhanced” and How Do We Know? A Critical Literature Review) by Kirkwood and Price (2014) provides a useful overview.

What do you make of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL)? Leave a reply in the comments below.

When you talk about..., it makes me thinka bout..., because...

Blogs

A blog is a website which usually takes the form of a series of posts arranged in reverse-chronologocal order, i.e. the most recent post appears at the top of the page. Students writing their own blogs, commenting on other people’s blogs, and consulting blogs written by experts in their field are common learning activities in Higher Education today.

social media flowers

How Slideshare spoiled my post on Social Media

I’ve been meaning to write an article about social media and learning for a long time. I’d planned to write about the benefits of wikis for collaborative group tasks; the joys of reflecting on one’s own learning with blogs; the ease with which we can share and discuss on social networks; and the plethora of still and moving imagery available on sites such as Flickr and YouTube. I was intending to demystify the world of social media for our avid readers. Instead I will simply link to a presentation about social media by Sarah Stewart.

Sarah is Professional Development Officer at Australian College of Midwives and she spoke to us a while ago about social media in higher education. She kindly and very sensibly (because her work and enthusiasm is made available to a far wider audience) puts her presentations on Slideshare.

I can view lots of Sarah’s presentations on Slideshare – she has 67 on there at the moment. On each one I can leave a comment, if I feel so inclined, or I can respond to someone else’s comments. By clicking on the ‘Share’ button on any presentation I can easily email the URL of the presentation to anyone and can share it on any Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook accounts I may have.Sarah Stewart's profile page on Slideshare

Read moreHow Slideshare spoiled my post on Social Media